Gyre #8 – Deborah Weir

by Dick Wilbur on March 29, 2016

Today we feature quilt artist and guest blogger Deborah Weir of Rolling Hill Estates, California

 

GYRE #8

I am a mixed media artist who works largely with textiles.  I often make contemporary quilts which I primarily hand stitch.  This is an homage to traditional “women’s work.”  However, I use modern materials – upcycled household plastics and more – which create reflective, dimensional surfaces to tell their stories and are READILY available!

With Gyre #8 I examine and comment upon our ever more polluted water and its impact on families.  Gyre #8 represents the difficulty women (and children) have when, after walking great distances, they encounter, instead of potable water, others’ detritus.  This is a particular tragedy in developing areas such as parts of Africa and Asia where women have often become an entire underclass.  They are frequently prevented from getting an advanced education, making a viable contribution to their cultures and pursuing their dreams as their time is spent in pursuit of clean water.  Filthy water can cause terrible health issues and shorten life expectancy as well.

Gyre #8 is comprised of a cotton ground fabric I ice-dyed and over-laid with commercial plastic packaging which has found its way into my home.   By means of repurposing this material, I am able to meet the objective of my artwork which is to awaken the mind and heart of the viewer.

Deborah Weir

21 Encanto Dr. Rolling Hills Estates CA 90274    (1) 310 325-1895 FiberFly@cox.net   DeborahWeir.net  FiberFly.blogspot.com  Behance.net/fiberfly

 

Gyre #8 – Deborah Weir

Artist’s Statement – Gyre #8 

Themes of importance to me: cave paintings of European and Australian continents, the fecundity of pomegranates and industrial detritus: rusty metal, bits of plastics and random “junk” which sparkles and seduces, guide me.

Here, I probe our ever more polluted water and its impact on families.  Gyre #8 represents the difficulty woman and children have, when after walking great distances they encounter others’ detritus instead of potable water.  This is a particular tragedy in developing areas in parts of the African and Asian continents where women have often come to represent an underclass.  They are frequently prevented from getting an advanced education, making a viable contribution to their cultures and pursuing their dreams as their time is spent in pursuit of clean water.  Filthy water can cause terrible health issues and shorten life expectancy as well.

Gyre #8 is comprised of an ice-dyed cotton ground fabric over-laid with commercial packaging plastic.  By means of repurposing this material, I am able to meet the objective of my artwork, to awaken the mind and heart of the viewer.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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